Addition of Complexity


I was reading a blog post from Ian Byrd today, called 7 Ways to Add Complexity. Ian does a great job of explaining ways that will add complexity to the gifted classroom. Complexity is a great way to add rigor to the curriculum.

One aspect that I feel is important to gifted children is that the curriculum be challenging and relevant. Gifted children want to be challenged. It is our job as GIS to figure out how to challenge them in a way that makes them grow, not only in learning, but as a person.

Last year I did a competition with my 7th graders. My students had to create a working simple machine based on some household items. The items changed as the challenge did each week. For one challenge I gave them a few household items such as plastics spoons, rubber bands, different sized popsicle sticks, and some pushpins. They had to make a catapult that would shoot a penny more than 10 feet. They worked with a partner to figure this out. I gave them 10 minutes on the computer to research catapults, and do make a rough design on paper. Once the time was up students had to use that materials and their simple sketch to make their model. Each of my students loved this. My extroverts loved to boast about their models, and my introverts were proud peacocks when they won.

Complexity can come in different forms. It can come in shortened time, and few resources. Complexity doesn’t have to be something over the top. Sometimes, you just have to shake things up to make them more interesting. Using items that are different from what the students would expect is great way to get complexity. For example Ian writes in the article mentioned above, that he had a 6th grader write an essay using kindergarten paper.

In our world of education, we have to push our gifted students more and more. We are expecting them to show growth through the year on standardized tests. I believe that without complexity and a good knowledge of differentiation skills students won’t progress like they should.

What do you do to add complexity to your curriculum? What differentiation strategies do you use that work best with gifted students? Share in the comments section below.

A Shameless Plug: On Sunday Feb 28 at 9pm ET #ohiogtchat will be doing a review of Ian’s work on Differentiation on Twitter. For more information follow @jeff_shoemaker and @HeatherCachat, or go to our website ohiogtchat.weebly.com

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